Worcester State University

 

Honors Abstracts


CHICAGO AS MODERN COUNTRY MUSIC MECCA

Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Ph.D.

Chicago, the economic and cultural capital of the state of Illinois and indeed the entire Great Lakes region, offered a home to the National Barn Dance (NBD) radio program, which reigned as the most important national radio program featuring rural folk music in the 1930s and 1940s. Yet, when the history of American music and broadcasting was written, Chicago’s part in the story was virtually forgotten. The NBD itself (before the production of the “Hayloft Gang” film and supplementary book project) did not figure highly in the memories of country music aficionados. Part of the problem stems from America’s preference for visual images. Perceptions of Chicago in the mid-twentieth century centered more on the images of immigrants, gangsters, and gunfights published by the nation’s newspapers and featured on American movie screens than on the wholesome sounds of these musicians.

 

MAKING A WAY OUT OF NO WAY: AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN AND THE SECOND GREAT MIGRATION

Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Ph.D.

Over seven years, I gathered oral histories with women migrants and their children, two groups largely overlooked in the story of the Second Great Migration, 1940-1970. Five million African Americans moved north during this migration, transforming the nation. The viewpoint of African American women has rarely been covered. The rich oral histories reveal much that is surprising. Although the Jim Crow South presented persistent dangers, the women retained warm memories of southern childhoods. Notwithstanding the burgeoning war industry, most women were left out of industrial work. The North offered its own institutionalized racism; the region was not the promised land. This project was published as a book in April 2009.

THE STRESS FROM NURSING SCHOOL IS RELATED TO STRAINED PERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS AND MAY NEGATIVELY IMPACT HEALTHY COPING MECHANISMS

Nicole Carvelli, Timily Henrickson, Christie Hudson, Amy Monaghan, Jilian Parzych

Faculty Adviser: Andrea Wallen, Ed.D.

Obtaining a bachelor’s degree in nursing is typically a four-year process that requires a great deal of energy. Stress experienced by students requires use of coping mechanisms that can be either healthy or unhealthy, which vary based on the individual. Stress experienced by nursing students may also impact personal relationships. The researchers administered a survey to senior level nursing students at Worcester State College. Students were asked to rate their stress level currently and during their past years. Focus areas included the impact of stress upon personal relationships, and coping mechanisms used to deal with stress.

 

FOOD ALLERGY AWARENESS ON A COLLEGE CAMPUS

Lyn Dembowski

Faculty Adviser: Jay Mahoney, Ph.D.

In the last 10 years there has been an estimated 18 percent increase in the number of people who suffer from food allergies in the United States. The purpose of this project, in its third year of development, is to heighten the awareness of food allergies. Food allergies pose a business problem, a moral mandate and an ethical dilemma to all organizations in the food industry. The federal and state governments have passed laws and many organizations have adopted policies to further protect those afflicted. I did extensive research of 15 colleges and looked to see if they had anything addressing students with food allergies. I created a proposal for a section to be added in the Student Handbook and put together an Information Packet for prospective students to let them know how they would be taken care of here at WSC.

 

ORAL HISTORY FOR THE WORCESTER WOMEN’S HISTORY PROJECT

Catherine Milkowski

Faculty Adviser: Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Ph.D.

I conducted an oral history research project for the Worcester Women’s History Project. My work will be archived at the Schlesinger Library for the History of Women in America at Harvard University and will be a resource for historians for hundreds of years to come. The project, conducted as part of my women’s studies class on campus, followed the guidelines of the Oral History Association. Anne Milkowski was born in Worcester, and works in the field of occupational therapy. In the interview, Milkowski poignantly reveals her struggle with breast cancer. I presented these findings in my women’s history course, take for honors credit, and at the Worcester Women’s History Project year-end research symposium.

 

ORAL HISTORY FOR THE WORCESTER WOMEN’S HISTORY PROJECT

Tonia Naughton

Faculty Adviser: Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Ph.D.

I conducted an oral history research project for the Worcester Women’s History Project. My work will be archived at the Schlesinger Library for the History of Women in America at Harvard University and will be a resource for historians for hundreds of years to come. The project, conducted as part of my women’s studies class on campus, followed the guidelines of the Oral History Association. I interviewed Constance Lauziere. She is a representative woman as she has been married three times; divorce is a growing trend in our culture. She also has run a day care program for 15 years; work in early childhood education is a frequently chosen field for working women.

 

ORAL HISTORY FOR THE WORCESTER WOMEN’S HISTORY PROJECT

Franklin Rosenberg

Faculty Adviser: Lisa Krissoff Boehm, Ph.D.

I conducted an oral history research project for the Worcester Women’s History Project. My work will be archived at the Schlesinger Library for the History of Women in America at Harvard University and will be a resource for historians for hundreds of years to come. The project, conducted as part of my women’s studies class on campus, followed the guidelines of the Oral History Association. I interviewed a local woman, Mary Anderson. The interview has been recorded and transcribed, and was presented at the Worcester Women’s History Project’s year-end research symposium on April 20. I also presented the findings in my women’s studies course, taken for honors credit.

 

PERFECT NUMBERS & PYTHAGOREAN TRIPLES

Kenneth Sanderson

Faculty Adviser: Hansun To, Ph.D.

Mathematicians have held a special interest in perfect numbers ever since they were discovered by early Greek mathematicians. In this field, it is always intriguing to see how different topics are related. In response to a proposed problem, I proved that if P is an even perfect number, then there exist positive integers a < b < c such that P = a + b + c and (a + b)^2 + (a + c)^2 = (b + c)^2; that is, (a + b; a + c; b + c) is a Pythagorean triple. I accomplished this using the famous Euclid-Euler Theorem.


 
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