Worcester State University

 

Communication Sciences and Disorders Abstracts


INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN UNDERLYING ORAL LANGUAGE COMPETENCIES ASSOCIATED WITH LEARNING TO READ: IMPLICATIONS FOR INTERVENTION

Linda S. Larrivee, Ph.D.

This chapter, co-authored with E.S. Maloney, M. S., is included in a book currently in press by A. Weiss (Ed.), titled: Perspectives on Individual Differences Affecting Therapeutic Change in Communication Disorders., published by Psychology Press. The chapter examines several aspects of oral language and how deficits in these areas relate to deficits in reading written language. Implications for individualized intervention are discussed. Many children with primary language impairments (LI) have difficulty learning to read. To enhance the effectiveness of the treatment they provide, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) can identify children’s specific areas of linguistic and metalinguistic weaknesses so that they can impact both oral and written language development.


EFFECT OF CO-OCCURRING INDIRECT ARTICULATION WITH DIRECT FLUENCY INTERVENTION

Kenneth S. Melnick, Ph.D.

Phonological and stuttering disorders frequently co-occur. When they do, it is difficult to decide how to treat them because treating the phonology directly may exacerbate the stuttering. One method of treating stuttering is through a combined fluency shaping and modification approach. When the two co-occur, they may be treated with an indirect approach to target the phonological disorder and a direct approach to treat the stuttering disorder. Rationale for using an indirect phonological method is because direct methods place too much pressure on the articulators, thereby increasing risk of exacerbating the fluency disorder.


MENTAL MEASUREMENT YEARBOOK REVIEWS

Roger L. Towne, Ph.D.

Reviews of the Clinical Assessment of Articulation and Phonology and the Hines Functional Dysphagia Scale were published in the seventeenth edition of the Mental Measurements Yearbook.


DIFFERENCE OR DISORDER? MONITORING ENGLISH HONOLOGY ACQUISITION AFTER INTERNATIONAL ADOPTION

Linda Larrivee, Ph.D., Susanna Meyer Ph.D., Katie Grady, M.S., Olivia Howley, M.S., and Emily Soltano, Ph.D.

Second first language learners are at risk for language disorders. Assessment procedures are limited for internationally adopted (IA) children. They cannot be assessed using the same assessment procedures as bilingual children. This longitudinal study investigated phonological acquisition of one native Tagalog speaker. Language samples were analyzed for phoneme accuracy and phonological patterns. The participant did not master phonemes according to chronological age and birth language. He produced idiosyncratic patterns within phonemes and phonological patterns. Results suggest the participant has a phonological disorder rather than a difference. This assessment procedure can guide speech-language pathologists in diagnosing phonological disorders in IA children.

NUTRITION AND HEARING SENSITIVITY

Kolbe Heroux

Faculty Adviser: Susanna Meyer, Ph.D.

It is general knowledge that a healthy diet is needed for proper whole body wellness. Recent research reveals how diet impacts hearing. Proper nutrients have a positive impact, while a deficient diet has a negative impact on hearing. The purpose of the research was to determine a correlation between nutrition and hearing loss in college-aged participants. All participants received a pure-tone threshold test, and completed a survey about eating habits and noise exposure. The survey and the hearing test results will be presented.These results have implications for nutrition education to promote hearing health.


 
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